What does object mean in a sentence?

Subject Predicate Object

You probably know the terms Subject, predicate and object from your elementary school days.

Do you still remember what they mean?

Exactly, there are terms for parts of a sentence.
Do you also remember how you can recognize the different parts of the sentence?
No? No problem. Just read the following explanations very carefully, do the exercises and you will notice that it is not that difficult at all.

The predicate

The predicate is easiest to recognize because it always consists of one Verb (do-word).

So the predicate describes what is being done.
Sometimes it can also consist of two parts.

The child gives the grandpa a picture.
Grandma hangs up the picture.

The subject

All predicates need a subject .
The subject is mostly the perpetrator who does something in the sentence.

It can consist of several words, often one Noun and one Article (companion).

You can ask it with the question "Who or what ...?"

The child gives the grandpa a picture.
Who or what gives grandpa a picture? the child

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Accusative and dative object

subject and predicate can be supplemented by objects.

There are, among others, the accusative object and the dative object. They too can like that subjectconsist of several words.

The Accusative object you can ask with the question "Who or what ...?"

The child gives the grandpa a picture.
Whom or what does the child give? a picture


The Dative object can be found out with the question "Who ...?"

The child gives the grandpa a picture.

Genitive object

The genitive object only comes very much today Rare in front.

Nevertheless, there are some sentences that need a genitive object, as it were.

You can determine the genitive object with the question “Whose ...?”.

The grandpa enjoyed his picture.
What was the grandpa enjoying? of his image

Prepositional object

As the name suggests, the prepositional object always consists of a preposition ( for, with, to, on ... ) and one Word group in the accusative or dative case.

To determine the prepositional object, look for a preposition in the sentence and include it in your question.

The child thanks grandpa for the gift.
For whom or what does the child thank the grandpa for? For the present.
Who does the child thank? With the grandpa.

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Notice!

predicate = Verb of the sentence
subject = Perpetrator = "Who or what ...?"
Accusative object = "Who or what ...?"
Dative object = "Whom ...?"
Genitive object = "Whose ...?"
Prepositional object = Object with preposition