What is the Halal Process

World Halal Union
World Halal Union

WHU has set itself the goal of taking every customer and their individual needs into account in the Halal certification process. When it comes to halal certification, WHU focuses on the food and cosmetics sector and offers advice and training. Halal certification has many advantages that lead to a respectful interaction between humans, animals and nature in the production of food and cosmetics. It is produced in a sustainable and economically responsible manner.

Independently

WHU is an independent and accredited testing and certification body for Halal products. With a technical-scientific orientation, our certification organization has specialized in independently testing and certifying products and production systems in the food industry in accordance with Islamic dietary regulations and purity laws (Halal guidelines). With our quality-based certification system, we offer consumers and companies alike a secure and credible certification of Halal products according to high, recognized standards.

Corporate philosophy

It is our corporate philosophy that Halal certification must guarantee consumers that the products are safe and suitable for consumption. For Muslims, our Halal certification guarantees that the products have been manufactured according to Islamic guidelines. For non-Muslims, Halal products are quality products simply because of the concept of halal and healthy, as we strongly advise all Halal certification applicants to meet the GMP and HACCP requirements. As a result, the products certified as Halal by WHU are safe for consumption or use, nutritious and of high quality.

HALAL standards

The result of our cooperation with the OIC / SMIIC Halal Standards guarantees that products and services that are certified by WHU receive permanent recognition and a high level of acceptance worldwide. Nevertheless, we continuously compare our testing and certification process with other recognized standards in order to maintain our progressive position. This includes a continuous update of our methods and quality levels, which are based on internationally recognized standards in the field of food safety as well as on requirements that are determined by the Halal guidelines.

HALAL standards

There is no single internationally recognized standard. The standards differ from country to country. We certify Halal according to the following standards:

    • OIC / SMIIC 1: 2012 (DHB-TS OIC / SMIIC 1: 2012)
      HDC - Halal Development Council - Malaysia
      DHC-Malaysia - Halal Industry Development Corporation
      United Arab Emirates (UAE) -UAE

Our quality policy

EVERY CUSTOMER IS UNIQUE Our principle and goal is the constant further development and improvement of the methods for the service provision that we offer our customers as part of the certification of Halal Management Systems. In parallel to the rapidly changing conditions in organization and technology nowadays, our staff is trained to be highly qualified, independent and neutral in all areas. The training courses convey the rules and laws that are required in international standards and guidelines such as ISO / IEC 17021, ISO 19011, EA 2/17. With this knowledge, we offer a punctual, fast and reliable service, for the benefit of each of our customers. The basis of our policy is customer orientation for fast service of a high quality level.

Our primary goal

Our primary goal is to carry out audits with our excellently trained staff and qualified pool of auditors, as well as people with industry-specific experience in the relevant areas, which help the customer to achieve added value through the certification process. With this conviction, we plan to become the leading company in the industry. We are aware that we can only achieve this goal with the participation of all internal and external employees. We are constantly working to improve the qualifications of all employees, the effectiveness of the processes and the pool of auditor experts by orienting the procedures that belong to our area of ​​activity to a system based on performance measurement. Our company is furthermore aware that every activity is part of continuous improvement and promises to apply the systematic approach in the management with the slogan “Every customer is unique” and the principles of truth and neutrality in the decision-making process.

additional quality features

our services

Our quality policy “Every customer is unique”.


  • Advice and certification

    Halal food production and Halal certification

  • Examinations and hygiene controls

    Chemical and microbiological studies

  • Training and hygiene advice

    Internal audit training


Halal certifications

It began in 1960 when Muslim majorities in various countries called for a regulation of Halal certification and this had to be secured.

The resulting Halal certification concepts are now recognized and lived in Muslim countries (especially in the OIC, Organization for Islamic Cooperation). The different understandings about Halal certification were difficult to control and different standards developed.

In addition to a global "common understanding" and "common recognition", several organizations were founded that formed the basis:

  • In 1999, the World Halal Council founded in Jakarta (Indonesia),
  • In 2007 the Halal Integrity Alliance ("IHI Alliance") and JAKIM in Malaysia and finally in 2010 the establishment of the Islamic Organization for Cooperation (OIC) with the SMIIC standard.

  • The OIC / SMIIC standard is more valuable because it places more demands on the certificate holder than before, it is not only a religious standard but has also integrated the following international food standards:
  • CODEX STAN 1 (General standard for the labeling of prepacked foods)
  • CAC / RCP 1 (Recommended international code of practice general principles of food hygiene)
  • CAC / RCP 58 (Code of hygienic practice for meat)
  • ISO 22000 (Food safety management systems - Requirements for any organization in the food chain
  • ISO 22005 (Traceability in the feed and food chain - General principles and basic requirements for system design and implementation
  • Good manufacturing practice (GMP)
  • Good hygienic practice (GHP)
  • Food safety
  • Genetically modified food (GMF)
  • Genetically modified organisms (GMO)
  • EU HACCP Codex

philosophy

It is our corporate philosophy that Halal certification must guarantee consumers that the products are safe and suitable for consumption. For Muslims, our Halal certification guarantees that the products have been manufactured according to Islamic guidelines. For non-Muslims, Halal products are quality products simply because of the concept of "Halal and Healthy", as we strongly advise all Halal certification applicants to meet at least the GMP and HACCP requirements. As a result, the products certified as Halal by WHU are safe for consumption or use, nutritious and of high quality.

Our certification process is also based on the OIC / SMIIC standards. These implemented standards continuously receive broad recognition for maintaining excellence in the field of Halal certification.

The result of our cooperation with the OIC / SMIIC Halal Standards guarantees that products and services that are certified by WHU receive permanent recognition and a high level of acceptance worldwide.

Certification

In Muslim countries it is assumed that food is "halal" in accordance with religious regulations.

For a certification it is imperative to say the name of Allah when slaughtering each animal.

With the certificate, the manufacturer assures the customer that the food was produced in accordance with Islamic religious dietary regulations and is therefore "halal". Health and hygiene aspects are checked separately during certification, but can be e.g. B. on the ban on ingesting foods that are harmful to health.

In addition to process certification, which includes interviews, tests of the origins of goods and of the production facility and processes, some certifiers carry out random checks for the presence of pork with the help of genetic tests and chemical analyzes for alcohol.

Certifications are partly carried out for promotional reasons, for example for foods such as pasta, for which there is hardly any possibility of violating the regulations from the outset. The exact requirements for certification differ in detail, often depending on the Koran interpretation of the authority on which the certifier refers. This does not refer to the basic dietary regulations themselves, but to their specific interpretation, e.g. B. with regard to the design and use of production facilities. There are different opinions as to whether or not animals stunned before slaughter are “halal” according to German animal welfare regulations.


Implementation of a HALAL certification

conditions

  • Use of Halal-compliant raw materials in the recipe.
  • Halal conformity must be verifiable.
  • There must be no mixing between Halal-compliant raw materials and non-compliant raw materials.
  • There must be no mix-up between Halal-compliant semi-finished goods and non-compliant semi-finished goods.
  • There must be no cross-contamination in the raw material store.
  • There must be no cross-contamination during production or on the production facilities.
  • No mixing of finished products may take place.
  • Cleaning agents and other auxiliary materials are allowed to have Halal status
    do not endanger.
  • The traceability of the products must be guaranteed.


Process characteristics

  • Develop a unique recipe based on raw materials that are available in Halal quality.
  • Specifications must clearly demonstrate Halal compliance.
  • Clear identification of the raw materials (color code, colored labels, clips, etc.).
  • Usual measures to avoid cross-contamination.
  • Production in daily batches with complete cleaning in between.
  • Get specifications and recipes approved by the Halal certifier.
  • Raw materials must be adequately packaged.
  • Specific Halal training for employees.
  • Perform cross-contamination analysis (PCR).

Halal is not just about food

"Halal" as a term for

  • improved living conditions for humans and animals
  • safe, clean and healthy food and consumer goods
  • sustainable and responsible management
  • respectful and fair treatment of all participants
    supply chain management (SCM) or supply chain management,

Relevant Halal criteria / information

In essence, the concept of Halal is much broader and not just limited to the slaughter of animals according to Islamic guidelines. For example, the Halal concept requires that the sources of cleanliness of raw materials and workplaces, hygiene and safety of employees and the environment are taken into account in the production process from the beginning to the manufacture of the product. The Halal concept is therefore not just a standard value for food. The following defines Halal in more detail in the production process:

  • Correct and moral trading ethics
  • Cleanliness of the workplace and the factory equipment
  • Fair dealings with employees
  • Preservation of nature and the environment
  • Sustainable development

  • In addition, the products are free of the following content:

  • any human body parts or ingredients of animal origin that are forbidden to Muslims; or are forbidden to use because they come from animals that have not been slaughtered according to Islamic guidelines
  • Substances or genetically modified organisms (GMO),
    classified as najas (unclean) according to Islamic guidelines
  • aliphatic alcohols
  • irradiated raw materials
  • Ingredients available to the consumer
    or harm the end user


In addition, no cross-contamination must occur during the production process and logistics. If the production process comes in connection with non-halal products, a thorough cleaning must be carried out (the process must guarantee the complete removal of residues, odors and / or paint in order to remove the impure substances, followed by a final rinse with water ) before halal production starts. This refers to all related machines, devices, utensils, surfaces and clothing, all of which should be free of non-halal components before the halal products are touched, processed, manufactured and packaged. Strict procedures must be in place to avoid packaging mix-ups or similar errors.

Halal not only for Muslims

From a health point of view, Halal seems to be a religion-driven concept because it is a core principle found in religion. However, the scope of the possible areas of application and business opportunities of the Halal concept is so extensive that not only members of the Islamic faith are involved. The Halal concept is therefore quite capable of including others, regardless of origin and religion, as long as the Halal requirements are met in the production process and in the services. The Halal concept by no means excludes non-Muslims from enjoying the ethical and high-quality halal goods produced. If you look at the Halal ethnic system, it is not surprising that there are already customers today who do not profess Islam, but still buy Halal-certified food.


Halal seminars / training courses

In order to train interested parties and entrepreneurs who are and want to be active in the halal industry and at the same time to create awareness of the global competitiveness of the halal industry, WHU would like to offer you the halal training program. This program will further strengthen the understanding of trust in the Halal market, expand the global appeal by educating people about the unique properties of Halal products and, in any case, will increase knowledge within the organization. We believe this training program will let you benefit in terms of recognizing, marketing, and creating spur power.

We also believe that through such collaboration, real-time use of Halal locally and internationally will present this as a preferred global standard for humankind, considering that the demand for Halal foods is not limited to the food manufacturers and the Consumer goods service is limited, but at the same time also non-food manufacturers and is not limited to education, hospitality, pharmaceuticals and retail.


additional quality features

The high requirements for Halal certification make the products interesting for all consumers who value quality and control.


  • Data worldwide

      With a worldwide customer base
      1.8 billion Muslims own halal
      one of the fastest growing global markets today.

      At the same time, Muslims account for around 1.84% annually
      the fastest growing population group.

      It is also an emerging market force
      the non-Muslims with their healthy,
      hygienic and pollution-free based
      Attracts principles in food production.

      The volume of Halal products is increased to around
      Estimated $ 2.1-2.3 trillion.

      This accounts for around 675-700 billion
      US dollars on the food sector.

  • Data Europe

      In Europe, the halal market is estimated at 70 billion euros.

      In France alone the industry is 7.5 billion euros,
      which even exceeds sales of organic goods.

      In Germany the volume is around 5 billion euros,
      whereby a large part is accounted for by meat and fish products.


Halal and animal welfare, social responsibility

In Islam, animal welfare is very important.WHU Germany-tested meat and meat products as well as products containing meat come from animals that have been stunned and slaughtered in accordance with the European animal welfare slaughtering ordinance and that have been completely bled. Aspects such as organic, fair trade, SA8000, animal welfare and corporate social responsibility are also included in a Halal certification. Since Muslims strive to act "Ihsan", i.e. to carry out every act in the best way and thus apply quality in all things, Halal certification must basically cover the entire production process from the field to the finished product. Halal meat products are often produced by slaughtering without anesthesia. This is forbidden in Germany according to §17 TierSchG. Anyone who violates this regulation commits at least one administrative offense.



This can only be circumvented by applying for an exemption in accordance with Section 4 of the TierSchG on presentation of a certificate of competence. For religious reasons, an exemption can also be applied for. According to the case law of the Federal Constitutional Court (slaughter judgment) of November 23, 2006, an exemption must be granted on request because of the unrestricted freedom of religion and belief according to Article 4 of the Basic Law as well as the freedom of occupation of an Islamic butcher, provided that the meat of the killed animal is from People are consumed, for whom mandatory religious regulations prohibit the consumption of the meat of non-slaughtered animals without exception. However, the slaughtering must be carried out by a competent person in an approved and registered slaughterhouse and monitored by the responsible veterinary office.

“Halal” (ḥalāl, Arabic حلال) - or in Turkish “Helal”.

“Halal” (halāl, Arabic حلال) - or in Turkish “Helal”.


  • Halal حلال

    is an Arabic word and can be translated as “permitted” and “permitted”.

  • makruh (undesirable)

    These things are not specifically prohibited, but tend to be haram.

  • haram (حرام)

    prohibited



Halal

What is halal Halal definition

“Halal” (halāl, Arabic حلال) - or in Turkish “Helal”. Halal (Arabic حلال, halāl) is an Arabic word and can be translated as “permitted” and “permitted”. The meaning of Halal is "what is permitted, permitted and permitted". Thus, Halal includes all things and actions that are permitted, permissible and in conformity with Islam from an Islamic perspective. It describes all things and actions that are permitted or permissible under Islamic law. As the third of the five categories of human actions in Islamic jurisprudence, it stands between haram (حرام), forbidden, and fard (فرض), obligatory actions. Between halal and haram there is a gray area called makruh (مكروه). Makruh (frowned upon / undesirable) denotes all things that are not expressly forbidden, but tend towards haram. As a precaution, Muslims should also avoid this gray area.

Similar to the organic seals or the Jewish kosher seals for food, there are so-called Halal certificates in stores. The aim is to identify products that are manufactured in compliance with the Halal rules.

"Halal - Helal" - stands for "permitted", "permitted" or "pure". Halal is used to describe all things and actions that are permitted or permitted under Islamic law. In contrast to this is

Haram (forbidden, unclean). The border area between Halal and Haram is with

Makruh (undesirable) described. Food or other aspects that fall under this are not expressly forbidden, but tend towards haram. Muslims should therefore avoid them completely. The question of halal does not only include food, but also food additives or packaging materials, right up to the transport of the products. Halal is therefore becoming a concept that aims to improve the standard of living and harmony between people and nature.

Religious background

Allah (The Exalted and Exalted) tells in the Qur'an what has been forbidden: The diet is regulated in the Qur'an and the Sunna. In principle, all foods are allowed, with the exception of those that have been expressly or clearly prohibited. A Muslim is prohibited from eating pork and its by-products, from consuming intoxicating beverages (alcohol) and from blood. Only animals may be eaten that are permitted for consumption, that have been properly slaughtered and that have not already died. An animal that has not been slaughtered is allowed if it was shot by specially trained hunting animals, but not by wild predators of unknown origin and health. Sacrificial animals of foreign religions are also prohibited.

In the Koran it says in sura 5, verse 3:

It is forbidden to you that which has perished by itself, as well as blood and pork, and that about which another name than Allah was invoked; the strangled; that which was beaten to death; that which has fallen or pushed to death and what ravenous animals have devoured, besides what you have slaughtered; and that which was slaughtered on an altar (as an offering to idols). (..) But whoever is forced by famine, without sinful inclination - then is Allah Forgiving, Merciful. "

As can be seen from the verse, Islam requires Muslims to adhere to certain eating, drinking and slaughtering regulations.

The following is narrated from the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him):

“What is allowed is evident and what is forbidden is evident, and between the two there are dubious things that many people are ignorant of. Those who stay away from it have thus acquitted themselves (of guilt). And those who fall into this realm, he has fallen into haram. "

Traditional slaughter without anesthesia, slaughtering, is practiced in most countries and preferred by most Muslims. Although the stunning is compatible with the Islamic Fiqh law, as the Muslim scholars have confirmed, it is not accepted by most Muslims because they fear that the animals will not survive the stunning.

Some traditions refer to sura 5, verse 5 and say that what is slaughtered by Christians or Jews is also allowed: Today all good things are allowed to you. And the food of those to whom the scriptures were given is lawful to you, just as your food is lawful to them. (..)

What is “Halal”, what is “Haram”?


What is "Haram"?

Harām (Arabic حرام, harām) is an Arabic adjective which in Islam describes everything that is "forbidden, inviolable, sacred" according to Sharia law. In its ambiguity, it corresponds most closely to the concept of taboo in German.

The opposite of harām is halāl (حلال), which means what is permitted under the Sharia. The adjective harām must be distinguished from the Arabic noun haram, which denotes a sacred area.

As a term for "forbidden", the term harām is already encountered in the Koran. Thus in sura 16: 116 people are asked not to claim with a lying tongue that one thing is permitted (halāl) and that another is forbidden (haraam). According to the Islamic view, a Muslim commits a sin by performing an act classified as haram by the Koran or by legal doctrine. In this sense, harām must be distinguished from the adjective mamnu 'ممنوع / mamnūʿ, which denotes what is forbidden in secular law.

Haram is the last of the five categories of human action in Islamic jurisprudence.



What is "Makruh"?

In Islam, makruh (Arabic مكروه, makrūh) refers to actions that are religiously unpopular and should therefore be avoided. According to Islamic tradition, the Muslim is not punished for performing unpopular acts, but is rewarded for failing to do so.

It is the fourth of the five categories of human action in Islamic jurisprudence.

Disliked acts include, for example, wasting water (e.g. during ritual ablutions) and disregarding popular or preferred acts - both during and outside of church services.

In general, any excessive act is considered unpopular.

According to some scholars, smoking is at least makruh, others even call it haram.



What is "Fard"?

Fard (Arabic فرض, fard "duty") also Arabic فريضة, farīda means "religious duty", "(divine) ordinance", "ordinance". Fard is the sum of those religious obligations that Muslims have to fulfill unconditionally in their ritual life. The verb for this is farada or iftarada and comes accordingly in the meaning of: "impose something on someone as a (religious) duty", "decree", "declare binding" both in the Koran and in the Hadith.



What is "Sunnah"?

Sunna (Arabic سنة, custom, customary way of doing things, traditional norm ') Pl. Sunan (سنن) is a term that in pre-Islamic times denoted the manners, customs, values ​​and norms of the various Arab tribes, in the course of formation Islam received a religious meaning by becoming the abbreviation for the sunnat an-nabī, the "behavior of the Prophet (Hz. Mohammed)", to be followed.

In this sense, Sunna is used in particular in Islamic jurisprudence and traditional science. Over time, there have been various shifts in the meaning of the term. The corresponding verb is استنّ سنّ, sanna / istanna ‚sth. to prescribe, to introduce sth.


The following are prohibited:

  • Food made from plants is basically “halal”, with the exception of intoxicating and toxic products. “Haram” includes all things that Muslims are not allowed to consume.
  • With regard to nutrition, the following main categories are prohibited as "haram":

  • Pigs, dogs, snakes, monkeys, carnivorous animals, e.g. B. lions, tigers, bears, birds of prey, e.g. B. eagles, vultures, rats, scorpions, non-halal slaughtered animals, reptiles, amphibians, insects, dead animals, blood, intoxicants, alcohol and alcoholic beverages.

  • "Pig" includes all foods and ingredients that may contain pig components or are obtained from them, e.g. B. gelatin. Pork is forbidden because the pig, as an omnivore, also eats waste and feces. According to the Koran, people should only eat what is “good”.

-

  • "Haram" is also the meat of birds of prey, land animals without ears, e.g. B. snakes and wild boars. Horse meat and donkey meat are also forbidden as the animals are intended for carrying loads. Only meat from slaughtered animals may be consumed, i. H. the meat must not come from animals that have died. The consumption of sacrificial animals of foreign religions is also prohibited. The consumption of fish is expressly permitted. In addition to the forbidden foods of animal origin, “haram” also includes intoxicating and toxic products of vegetable origin as well as alcohol and alcoholic beverages.

  • In addition to the forbidden foods of animal origin, “haram” also includes intoxicating and toxic products of vegetable origin as well as alcohol and alcoholic beverages.

The division into “haram” and “halal” is not always that easy. The diverse processes involved in the production and preparation of food can lead to contamination that can make permitted food “haram”. They can be contaminated by prohibited additives, such as gelatine made from pig ingredients, emulsifiers, flavorings, colorings, or they can also be transported or stored together in insufficient packaging.


    Koran suras / Helal ile ilgili Ayetler:

    “Halal” (halāl, Arabic حلال) - or in Turkish “Helal”.

    The Cow / Sura 168.

    O people, eat of what is lawful (and) good on earth; and do not follow in the footsteps of Satan; verily he is an obvious enemy to you.


    The cow / sura 172.

    O you who believe, eat of the good things We have given you and give thanks to Allah if it is He Who you worship. 173. He has forbidden you only that which has died of his own accord and blood and pork and that about which a name other than Allah has been invoked. But whoever is driven by need - not disobedience and exceeding the standard - it should not be a sin for him. Allah is Forgiving, Merciful.


    The table / sura 3.

    It is forbidden to you that which perishes by itself, as well as blood and pork, and that about which a name other than Allah was invoked; the strangled; that which was beaten to death; that which has fallen or pushed to death and that which ravenous animals have eaten apart from what you have slaughtered; and that which was slain on an altar (as an offering to idols); also that you seek to explore your fate by means of arrows. That is disobedience. Today the unbelievers are desperate of your faith, so do not fear them, but fear me. Today I have completed your doctrine of faith for you and fulfilled my grace for you and chose Islam for you to confess. But whoever is driven by hunger without sinful intent - then Allah is Forgiving, Merciful.


    The table / sura 4.

    They ask you what they are allowed to do. Say: «All good things are lawful to you; and what you have taught (to catch) animals and birds of prey by training them to hunt and teaching them what Allah has taught you. So eat what they catch for you and say Allah's name on it. And fear Allah, for Allah is quick in accounting. "


    The table / sura 62.

    And you see how many of them race for sin and transgression and eating forbidden things. Verily what they do is evil


    The table / sura 87.

    O you who believe, do not declare as illicit the pure things which Allah has allowed you, but do not transgress anything either. For Allah does not love transgressors.


    The table / sura 88.

    And eat of what Allah has given you: what is permitted, what is pure. And fear Allah, in whom you believe.


    The cattle / sura 118.

    So eat what Allah's name was spoken of if you believe in His signs.


    The cattle / sura 69.

    8. The corruption of war / 69. So eat of what you have won (in war) as is lawful and good, and fear Allah. Verily, Allah is Forgiving, Merciful.


    16. The bee / sura 114.

    So eat now of the lawful good things with which Allah has provided you; and be grateful for the grace of Allah if it is He whom you serve.


    23. The Believers / Sura 51.

    O you messengers, eat of the pure things and do good. Verily, I know very well what you are doing.



    Numbers, dates and facts

    Halal products currently make up 20% of global food production.


      • With a worldwide customer base
        1.8 billion Muslims own halal
        one of the fastest growing global markets today.

        At the same time, Muslims account for around 1.84% annually
        the fastest growing population group.

        It is also an emerging market force
        the non-Muslims with their healthy,
        hygienic and pollution-free based
        Attracts principles in food production.

        The volume of Halal products is increased to around
        Estimated $ 2.1-2.3 trillion.

        This accounts for around 675-700 billion
        US dollars on the food sector.

    • Data Europe

        In Europe, the halal market is estimated at 70 billion euros.

        In France alone the industry is 7.5 billion euros,
        which even exceeds sales of organic goods.

        In Germany the volume is around 5 billion euros,
        whereby a large part is accounted for by meat and fish products.


    Business areas - industrial areas

    WHU has set itself the goal of taking every customer and their individual needs into account in the Halal certification process. When it comes to halal certification, WHU focuses on the food and cosmetics sector and offers advice and training. Halal certification has many advantages that lead to a respectful interaction between humans, animals and nature in the production of food and cosmetics. It is produced in a sustainable and economically responsible manner.

    Halal certification for companies from the following business areas:

  • food industry
  • chemistry
  • Pharmacy and medicine
  • Cosmetics industry
  • Slaughterhouses
  • Health care, hospitals, rehab
  • Trade and service
  • Consumer goods
  • Education, schools, kindergarten
  • Hotel and hospitality industry


You will find further interesting information on the subject of Halal certifications on the homepages of the organizations listed below. You will also find links to our halal standards / halal food standards and standards giver as well as to our friendly websites.

* Further information is available by clicking on the respective logo *.


Memberships:



Weld Halal Union

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