What ends on Veterans Day


Photo courtesy of the Defense Visual Information Centerr

This holiday was originally called Armistice Day (Armistice Day) and was celebrated in honor of the Americans who took part in the First World War. It falls on November 11th, the day the war ended in 1918. Today is a Memorial Day honoring all war veterans from all wars in which the United States participated.

War Veterans Associations hold parades or other special celebrations, and the President or other senior government officials lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery.

See also:
About the USA> History> War, Prosperity, and Collapse

Veterans Day Honor Those Who Have Served in the U.S. Military
Veterans Day originated in the Armistice Day holiday commemorating the November 11, 1918, armistice at 11 a.m. (hence "the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month"), which suspended active hostilities and effectively ended the First World War.
President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed November 11, 1919, the first Armistice Day with the following words: "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country's service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…. " (America.gov, November 10, 2009)

Veterans ’Wartime Memories Find Home in Library of Congress
Veterans History Project preserves accounts for future generations and scholars (America.gov, June 27, 20008)