Is there a classified website owner

Overview: website governance, authorization, and sharing with website owners

Use this article as an overview of ideas and best practices for your website's governance model. If you own a website, create a governance model that addresses website policies and processes, and defines roles and responsibilities. Such a model helps you manage how people use your website. You can e.g. For example, you may require files to be checked out so that a file cannot be edited by more than one person at the same time.

Note: Many sharing and authorization rules are set by the SharePoint administrator. Use this article as a basic guide to understand what control you have as a website owner. Contact your SharePoint administrator if you want to make changes to your organization's governance strategy.

Roles and responsibilities for website support

Defining roles and responsibilities during the planning and creation of your website reduces the need to clean up or reorganize a website as people join or leave the team on a rotating basis. As part of website governance, consideration should also be given to establishing a plan for training users, monitoring website usage, monitoring content, and communicating expectations to the team members managing the website.

Consider prioritizing and defining the following:

  • Website training for website owners: Provide basic navigation, search, and document management training for new website owners.

  • Website support: Designate a member of your team as a website expert who will be responsible for troubleshooting issues and liaising with the SharePoint administrator.

  • Website creation and usage guidelines: Organizations often have company guidelines in place for creating a website. Provide an up-to-date link to the appropriate guidelines. Provide contact information for website owners and content authors in case they need help.

  • Content Publishing and Monitoring: Schedule website and page content monitoring as often as needed to keep the website relevant. Establish a monitoring schedule and appoint content owners for large lists and libraries.

Standard SharePoint Groups

title

Standard authorization level

Used for

owner

Full control

Manage website permissions, settings, and appearance.

member

Edit and contribute

Editing of website content. The level of permission depends on the website template that was used to create the website.

Visitor

Read only

People who need to be able to see the content of the website but are not allowed to edit it.

Modern website governance

In the current version of SharePoint, website governance is more important than in previous versions, as it allows more control and options for a new website creation. Your organization's website governance depends on how much control your organization needs over its content. This sets the details for website creation and website owner governance. Your SharePoint administrator can help you better understand security, regulatory, company branding, accessibility, and training guidelines. Before creating your website governance plan, check with your SharePoint administrator for more information about your organization's guidelines for creating and using websites.

Modern SharePoint site navigation structure

The most effective SharePoint sites help users quickly find what they need so they can use the information they find to make decisions, learn what's going on, access the tools they need, or collaborate with colleagues to create a Solve a problem. Learn more about planning site navigation in SharePoint.

Part of the information architecture may also include the classification of information. If the information you post is of high value to the business, if special security precautions are in place, or if government regulations need to be met for compliance, consider creating a classification scheme to identify the specific types of content that need to be managed particularly carefully. After you've saved the information in specific lists and libraries, you can use governance features to determine how you want the content to be displayed.

The modern SharePoint architecture is designed in such a way that it adapts flexibly and dynamically to the changing requirements of your organization. Modern websites can be linked to hub websites. The associated sites then share navigation and branding with the hub and, if the site owner permits, hub permissions as well.

When determining the navigation structure of your website, consider the following:

  • What kind of content is used on the website? How is the content structured in pages, lists, libraries?

  • How should the information be presented on the website?

  • How do you want users to navigate the site?

  • How should the information be interpreted for specific target groups?

  • How should the search be configured and optimized?

Manage permissions in modern websites

The completeness, confidentiality, and protection of an organization's business data depends on how secure you make a website, especially who you give access to your website. Managing permissions in modern websites involves both users and groups of users. Permissions in modern communication and team sites come from the site templates, which have different options for each site.

Communication sites are not assigned to any Microsoft 365 groups and have three standard roles: site owner, site member, and site visitor.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when developing an authorization strategy:

  • Follow the principle of minimum rights: Assign users the lowest level of privilege they need to perform their tasks.

  • Use standard groups: Grant users access by adding them to standard groups (such as members, visitors, or owners).

  • Consider segmenting your content based on security levels: Create a website or library specifically for confidential documents instead of scattering them in a large library and protecting them with special permissions.

Modern website permissions by title

title

Authorization level

Authorization for:

Website owner

Full control

In addition to everything a site member can do, owners can do the following:

Change the website design

Change the navigation layout

Change the website logo

Adding or removing website owners

Edit the settings for site members

Add or remove website visitors

Edit website settings

Delete the website

Add a Microsoft 365 group

Associate the website with a hub

Website member

Edit and contribute

Adding, editing and deleting lists

Add, edit and delete document libraries

Add or remove website members

Add, edit and remove documents

Add, edit and delete a page

Adding, editing and deleting a news item

Add, edit and delete a section of a page

Add, edit and delete web parts

Add, edit and delete website navigation

Create or delete page templates

View website usage statistics

Website visitors

Read only

View content

Additional resources for website owners:

Website governance

An important, but often invisible, part of any website is the associated one Governance model - the set of policies, roles, responsibilities, and processes that you set up to determine how the people in your group can use SharePoint.

Many organizations have a website governance model at either the central administration or the site collection level that is created and maintained by the IT department or IT team. As the site owner, you need to determine if a site collection or farm governance model already exists. If so, you can use this to guide your website users or create an additional governance model for your specific problems. For example, if you are the owner of a subsite in a site collection; B. a classic team website, it can make sense to create your own additional governance model that takes special problems in a sub-website into account.

A governance model for a website makes it easy for website users to identify when to create a new subsite, list, or other website content. It ensures subsites and content are withdrawn when they are out of date to save space and deliver relevant search results. It enables users to access the right content and maintain website branding anywhere by letting subsite owners know what templates and designs are available. It's also easier to change website owners when someone leaves the organization.

A good governance model for a website should focus on the following parts:

  • Creation of websites

  • Authorization management

  • Information architecture

  • Website lifecycle and discontinuation

  • Storage limits

  • Classification of information

  • Adaptation

  • privacy

  • navigation

  • Search

  • Roles and responsibilities for website support

Some of the items on the previous list may already have been decided for you in the governance model at the site collection level or at the company level, such as the amount of storage available to your website and the adjustments you can make to the look and feel of the website. Other questions may not be relevant to you, depending on the complexity of the team site and the number of active users. But even if you don't have to make any decisions about these issues, it is good to know what decisions have been made so that you can inform website users accordingly and properly implement the guidelines.

Creation of subsites

You may want team members to be able to create subsites for specific projects under the team website.

The ability to create new subsites on the fly can be of great benefit to the group, but unrestricted website creation can quickly get out of hand. If there is no limit to the number of subsites that can be created, problems can arise. Examples:

  • It becomes difficult for users to find the correct subsite or to make sure they found the correct subsite.

  • Information can be duplicated on multiple subsites, consuming expensive storage space and doubling maintenance.

  • Subsites can contain information that is out of date - potentially for years - and that is displayed in search results. This can make it difficult to determine which information is correct.

  • Managing permissions for a large number of subsites can become problematic, and users can mistakenly gain access to information that is not intended for them.

  • When employees leave the group, the subsites they create may become "ownerless", creating confusion and diluting search results for the remaining site users.

You can save time and effort by establishing some website creation guidelines that relate to the following areas:

  • Who can create subsites?

  • Do new subsites need to be approved in advance? If so, what are the criteria for approval and who is responsible for approval?

  • Do you want to use defined templates and designs for new subsites?

  • How much information can be stored on a website? That is, how much storage space can it use on the server?

  • What are the rules for including navigation strategies on the website?

  • How long should information be kept on subsites before it is deleted or archived?

For more information, see Create a website or subsite.

Authorization management

The completeness, confidentiality, and protection of an organization's business data depends on how secure you make a website, especially who you give access to your website.

Granting and restricting access to the website is known as permission management and is one of the most important responsibilities of a website owner.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when developing an authorization strategy:

  • Adhere to the principle of minimum privilege: give people the lowest level of privilege they need to complete their assigned tasks.

  • Grant users access by adding them to standard groups (such as members, visitors, or owners). Make most people members of the Members or Visitors group, and limit the number of people in the Owners group.

  • Work with authorization inheritance to create a clear and easy-to-display hierarchy, i. That is, avoid giving permissions to individuals and work with groups instead. Whenever possible, make sure subsites inherit permissions from the team site rather than granting unique permissions.

  • Organize content in a way that takes advantage of permission inheritance: Consider segmenting your content according to security levels. Create a website or library specifically for confidential documents instead of distributing them in a large library and protecting them with special permissions.

For information about setting permissions, see Understanding Permission Levels in SharePoint or Controlling Access to Specific Content.

Information architecture

The information architecture of a website is like the table of contents of a book: it determines how the information on that website, i. H. the web pages, documents, lists and data are organized and presented to the website users. Information architecture is often recorded as a hierarchical list of website content, search keywords, data types, and other concepts.

To create an information architecture, you must first analyze the information that you want to present on the website. Here are a few questions to help you develop an information architecture:

  • What kind of content is used on the website? How can the content be structured using subsites, lists, libraries, etc.?

  • How should the information be presented on the website?

  • How do you want users to navigate the site?

  • How should the information be interpreted for specific target groups?

  • How should the search be configured and optimized?

Part of the information architecture may also include the classification of information.

If the information you process is of high value to the business, if special safeguards are in place, or if government regulations are required for compliance, you may want to create a classification scheme to identify the specific types of content that are most carefully managed Need to become.

After you've saved the information in specific lists and libraries, you can use governance features to determine how the content should be managed. Examples:

Files check out required

When a file needs to be checked out, you can ensure that only one person can edit the file until it is checked back in. If documents need to be checked out, it can prevent multiple people from making changes at the same time. So there can be no editing conflicts that would lead to confusion. It can also be used to remind team members to add a comment when they check in a file, making it easier to keep track of what changes have been made in each version.For more information, see Set Up a Site Library to Request Check Out Files.

Track versions

If you need to keep previous versions of files, you can use libraries to track, save, and restore the files. You can choose to track all versions the same way. But you can also use some versions as major versions, e.g. For example, if you have added a new chapter to a manual and mark some versions as minor versions, e. B. If you have corrected a spelling mistake. To make it easier to manage storage space, you can set the number of each type of version to be saved. For more information, see How does versioning work in a list or library ?.

Document approval required

You can choose to require a document to be approved. Documents remain in a waiting state until they are approved or rejected by someone with the appropriate authorization. It is up to you to determine which user groups can view a document before it is approved. This feature can be useful if your library has important policies or procedures that need to be completed before others can see them. For more information about document approval, see Set an Approval Request for Items in a Site List or Library.

Be informed about changes

Libraries support RSS technology so that members of a workgroup can automatically receive and view updates or feeds of news and information in a common location. You can use RSS technology to alert you to changes to the library, for example if files stored in the library are changed. RSS feeds allow members of the workgroup to see a unified list of files that have changed. You can also create email notifications so that you are notified of file changes. For more information about RSS feeds, see Managing RSS Feeds for a Website or Site Collection.

A document library or content type can use workflows that your organization has defined for business processes, such as: B. managing document approval or review. Your group can apply business processes to their documents, known as workflows, that address actions that need to be taken one at a time, such as: B. approving or translating documents. A workflow is an automated way of moving a document or item through a sequence of actions or tasks. By default, three workflows are available for libraries: "Approval", which routes a document to a group of people for approval; "Gathering Feedback", where a document is forwarded to a group of people to collect feedback and the document is returned as a statement to the person who started the workflow; "Collect signatures" where a document is forwarded to a group of people to collect their digital signatures. For more information about workflows, see About the Workflows Included in SharePoint.

Define content types

If your group works with multiple types of files, such as: You can extend the functionality of your library by allowing and defining multiple content types, such as spreadsheets, presentations and documents. Content types lead to greater flexibility and consistency between multiple libraries. You can define a template and workflow processes for each content type. The templates serve as a starting point for formatting and all text modules as well as for properties that apply to documents of this type, e.g. B. Department name or contract number. For more information about content types, see Introduction to content types and content type publishing.

If you have a group of sensitive files and it would be helpful to know how the documents were used, then you can define a policy to enable revision tracking of events, such as: B. from file changes, copying or deleting processes. For more information about setting up monitoring, see Configure Monitoring Settings for a Site Collection

Website lifecycle and discontinuation

Sites like document workspaces and discussion sites tend to last longer than they are really useful, consuming valuable storage space and watering down search results. It is therefore advisable to set up a schedule for regular reviews (at least once a year) of websites and their content to check whether it makes sense to keep them going.

Also, keep in mind that your company's overarching governance model may also be checking for outdated websites. For example, an administrator can automatically delete websites that have been inactive for 90 days. As the website owner, you will receive a corresponding warning by email in this case. For more information about lifecycle and hiring policies, see Site Closing Policies.

Storage limits

The administrator may have limited the amount of hard disk space your group can use. You need to know if there is a storage limit and, if so, decide how to divide the available space among websites, web pages, and libraries.

By default, SharePoint Server sets the maximum size for a single document that can be uploaded to a document library to 50MB, and by default, team site owners receive a warning when 90% of their storage quota is used.

After you have found out how large your storage quota is, you can use functions such as version or revision tracking to ensure that the quota is not exceeded.

Search

Content occurs in many places, such as websites, lists, libraries, web parts, and list columns. When someone searches the website, all of the website's content and pages will appear in the search results.

As a website owner, you can decide whether the content of your website is displayed in search results. If you block content from a website in search results, the content of all subsites below it will also be blocked from display in search results.

By default, restricted content does not appear in search results for users who do not have permission to read that content. This setting can be changed so that restricted content appears in search results but can only be opened by users with the appropriate permissions.

privacy

Data backup and recovery features protect your data from accidental data loss. The frequency of the data backup as well as the speed and degree of restoration are determined by an administrator. For information about how to restore content to your website, see Restore Items in the Recycle Bin.

More resources

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